A Beleaguered City Margaret Oliphant

ISBN: 9781402191732

Published:

Paperback

277 pages


Description

A Beleaguered City  by  Margaret Oliphant

A Beleaguered City by Margaret Oliphant
| Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, ZIP | 277 pages | ISBN: 9781402191732 | 5.15 Mb

It was on a summer evening about sunset, the middle of the month of June, that my attention was attracted by an incident of no importance which occurred in the street, when I was making my way home, after an inspection of the young vines in my newMoreIt was on a summer evening about sunset, the middle of the month of June, that my attention was attracted by an incident of no importance which occurred in the street, when I was making my way home, after an inspection of the young vines in my new vineyard to the left of La Clairière.

In a moment the tinkle of a little bell warned all the bystanders of the procession which was about to pass, carrying the rites of the Church to some dying person. Just in front of me was Jacques Richard, always a troublesome individual, standing doggedly, with his hat upon his head and his hands in his pockets, straight in the path of M.

le Curé. There is not in all France a more obstinate fellow. He stood there, notwithstanding the efforts of a good woman to draw him away, and though I myself called to him. M. le Curé is not the man to flinch- and as he passed, walking as usual very quickly and straight, his soutane brushed against the blouse of Jacques. He gave one quick glance from beneath his eyebrows at the profane interruption, but he would not distract himself from his sacred errand at such a moment. It is a sacred errand when anyone, be he priest or layman, carries the best he can give to the bedside of the dying.

I said this to Jacques when M. le Curé had passed and the bell went tinkling on along the street. Jacques, said I, I do not call it impious, like this good woman, but I call it inhuman. What! a man goes to carry help to the dying, and you show him no respect!This brought the color to his face- and I think, perhaps, that he might have become ashamed of the part he had played- but the women pushed in again, as they are so fond of doing. Oh, M. leMaire, he does not deserve that you should lose your words upon him!

they cried- and, besides, is it likely he will pay any attention to you when he tries to stop even the bon Dieu?



Enter the sum





Related Archive Books



Related Books


Comments

Comments for "A Beleaguered City":


kawaianhub.com

©2013-2015 | DMCA | Contact us